Historical relevance of a day to celebrate motherly love

Mother’s Day celebrations are attached with great sentimental value. It is marked on the second Sunday in May, and is celebrated in almost all countries of the world, including  China, Japan, India, the UK, the US, Denmark, Italy, Turkey, Australia, and Canada among others.

The occasion is treated as an opportunity by grateful sons and daughters across the world to honor their mother and grandmother for all the sacrifices that they have made in upbringing them.

Some historians believe that the Mother’s Day celebrations originated from ancient spring festivities that were dedicated to maternal goddesses. Greeks used to honor Rhea, wife of Cronus and mother of the gods and goddesses of ancient Greek mythology. It is claimed that Ancient Romans had a spring festival to honor Cybele, also termed a mother goddess. called Hilaria, this celebration was spread over three days. It comprised parades, masquerades and games.

A modern version of Mother’s Day was started in the 1600s in the UK. Mothering Sunday was then marked on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Gifts were given, and a special dessert ‘ simnel cake’ was prepared. The celebration got a big boost in the early 20th century in the United States, and became synonymous with the ancient traditions in several other countries to appreciate the mother’s role in our lives.

In the US, Anna Jarvis – though never a mother herself – ran a movement for national recognition of Mother’s Day! Jarvis hosted a special ceremony in 1907 to honor her late mother. She also launched a campaign for a national holiday honoring mothers. West Virginia incidentally became the first state in 1910 to recognize it. President Wilson declared the second Sunday in May to be Mother’s Day in 1914.

Mother’s Day continues to be a popular holiday all over the world since then. It’s the perfect day to gift your mother flowers, candy and greetings cards to express your gratitude towards your dear mother. Happy Mother’s Day!

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